Risk Factors

We face a variety of risks in our business. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones facing us. Additional risks and uncertainties that we are unaware of or that we currently believe to be immaterial, may also become important factors that affect us. 

Risks Related to Our Business, Strategy and Operations

Our profitability depends on reaching certain minimum vehicle sales volumes. If our vehicle sales deteriorate, particularly sales of our minivans, larger utility vehicles and pick-up trucks, our results of operations and financial condition will suffer.

Our success requires us to achieve certain minimum vehicle sales volumes. As is typical for an automotive manufacturer, we have significant fixed costs and, therefore, changes in vehicle sales volume can have a disproportionately large effect on our profitability. For example, assuming constant pricing, mix and cost of sales per vehicle, that all results of operations were attributable to vehicle shipments and that all other variables remain constant, a ten percent decrease in our 2014 vehicle shipments would reduce our Earnings Before Interest and Taxes, or EBIT, by approximately 40 percent for 2014, without accounting for actions and cost containment measures we may take in response to decreased vehicle sales.

Further, a shift in demand away from our minivans, larger utility vehicles and pick-up trucks in the U.S., Canada, Mexico and Caribbean islands, or NAFTA, region towards passenger cars, whether in response to higher fuel prices or other factors, could adversely affect our profitability in the NAFTA region. Our minivans, larger utility vehicles and pick-up trucks accounted for approximately 44 percent of our total U.S. retail vehicle sales in 2014 (not including vans and medium duty trucks) and the profitability of this portion of our portfolio is approximately 33 percent higher than that of our overall U.S. retail portfolio on a weighted average basis. A shift in demand such that U.S. industry market share for minivans, larger utility vehicles and pick-up trucks deteriorated by 10 percentage points and U.S. industry market share for cars and smaller utility vehicles increased by 10 percentage points, whether in response to higher fuel prices or other factors, holding other variables constant, including our market share of each vehicle segment, would have reduced the Group’s EBIT by approximately 4 percent for 2014. This estimate does not take into account any other changes in market conditions or actions that the Group may take in response to shifting consumer preferences, including production and pricing changes.

Moreover, we tend to operate with negative working capital as we generally receive payments from vehicle sales to dealers within a few days of shipment, whereas there is a lag between the time when parts and materials are received from suppliers and when we pay for such parts and materials; therefore, if vehicle sales decline we will suffer a significant negative impact on cash flow and liquidity as we continue to pay suppliers during a period in which we receive reduced proceeds from vehicle sales. If vehicle sales do not increase, or if they were to fall short of our assumptions, due to financial crisis, renewed recessionary conditions, changes in consumer confidence, geopolitical events, inability to produce sufficient quantities of certain vehicles, limited access to financing or other factors, our financial condition and results of operations would be materially adversely affected.

Our businesses are affected by global financial markets and general economic and other conditions over which we have little or no control.

Our results of operations and financial position may be influenced by various macroeconomic factors—including changes in gross domestic product, the level of consumer and business confidence, changes in interest rates for or availability of consumer and business credit, energy prices, the cost of commodities or other raw materials, the rate of unemployment and foreign currency exchange rates—within the various countries in which we operate.

Beginning in 2008, global financial markets have experienced severe disruptions, resulting in a material deterioration of the global economy. The global economic recession in 2008 and 2009, which affected most regions and business sectors, resulted in a sharp decline in demand for automobiles. Although more recently we have seen signs of recovery in certain regions, the overall global economic outlook remains uncertain.

In Europe, in particular, despite measures taken by several governments and monetary authorities to provide financial assistance to certain Eurozone countries and to avoid default on sovereign debt obligations, concerns persist regarding the debt burden of several countries. These concerns, along with the significant fiscal adjustments carried out in several countries, intended to manage actual or perceived sovereign credit risk, led to further pressure on economic growth and to new periods of recession. Prior to a slight improvement in 2014, European automotive industry sales declined over several years following a period in which sales were supported by government incentive schemes, particularly those designed to promote sales of more fuel efficient and low emission vehicles. Prior to the global financial crisis, industry-wide sales of passenger cars in Europe were 16 million units in 2007. In 2014, following six years of sales declines, sales in that region rose 5 percent over 2013 to 13 million passenger cars. From 2011 to 2014, our market share of the European passenger car market decreased from 7.0 percent to 5.8 percent, and we have reported losses and negative EBIT in each of the past four years in the Europe, Middle East and Africa, or EMEA, segment. See Overview—Overview of Our Business for a description of our reportable segments. These ongoing concerns could have a detrimental impact on the global economic recovery, as well as on the financial condition of European financial institutions, which could result in greater volatility, reduced liquidity, widening of credit spreads and lack of price transparency in credit markets. Widespread austerity measures in many countries in which we operate could continue to adversely affect consumer confidence, purchasing power and spending, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

A majority of our revenues have been generated in the NAFTA segment, as vehicle sales in North America have experienced significant growth from the low vehicle sales volumes in 2009-2010. However, this recovery may not be sustained or may be limited to certain classes of vehicles. Since the recovery may be partially attributable to the pent-up demand and average age of vehicles in North America following the extended economic downturn, there can be no assurances that continued improvements in general economic conditions or employment levels will lead to additional increases in vehicle sales. As a result, North America may experience limited growth or decline in vehicle sales in the future.

In addition, slower expansion or recessionary conditions are being experienced in major emerging countries, such as China, Brazil and India. In addition to weaker export business, lower domestic demand has also led to a slowing economy in these countries. These factors could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

In general, the automotive sector has historically been subject to highly cyclical demand and tends to reflect the overall performance of the economy, often amplifying the effects of economic trends. Given the difficulty in predicting the magnitude and duration of economic cycles, there can be no assurances as to future trends in the demand for products sold by us in any of the markets in which we operate.

In addition to slow economic growth or recession, other economic circumstances—such as increases in energy prices and fluctuations in prices of raw materials or contractions in infrastructure spending—could have negative consequences for the industry in which we operate and, together with the other factors referred to previously, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We may be unsuccessful in efforts to expand the international reach of some of our brands that we believe have global appeal and reach.

The growth strategies reflected in our 2014-2018 Strategic Business Plan, or Business Plan, will require us to make significant investments, including to expand several brands that we believe to have global appeal into new markets. Such strategies include expanding sales of the Jeep brand globally, most notably through localized production in Asia and Latin America and reintroduction of the Alfa Romeo brand in North America and other markets throughout the world. Our plans also include a significant expansion of our Maserati brand vehicles to cover all segments of the luxury vehicle market. This will require significant investments in our production facilities and in distribution networks in these markets. If we are unable to introduce vehicles that appeal to consumers in these markets and achieve our brand expansion strategies, we may be unable to earn a sufficient return on these investments and this could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. 

Product recalls and warranty obligations may result in direct costs, and loss of vehicle sales could have material adverse effects on our business.

We, and the U.S. automotive industry in general, have recently experienced a significant increase in recall activity to address performance, compliance or safety-related issues. The costs we incur to recall vehicles typically include the cost of replacement parts and labor to remove and replace parts, substantially depend on the nature of the remedy and the number of vehicles affected, and may arise many years after a vehicle’s sale. Product recalls may also harm our reputation and may cause consumers to question the safety or reliability of our products.

Any costs incurred, or lost vehicle sales, resulting from product recalls could materially adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. Moreover, if we face consumer complaints, or we receive information from vehicle rating services that calls into question the safety or reliability of one of our vehicles and we do not issue a recall, or if we do not do so on a timely basis, our reputation may also be harmed and we may lose future vehicle sales.

We are also obligated under the terms of our warranty agreements to make repairs or replace parts in our vehicles at our expense for a specified period of time. Therefore, any failure rate that exceeds our assumptions may result in unanticipated losses.

Our future performance depends on our ability to expand into new markets as well as enrich our product portfolio and offer innovative products in existing markets.

Our success depends, among other things, on our ability to maintain or increase our share in existing markets and/ or to expand into new markets through the development of innovative, high-quality products that are attractive to customers and provide adequate profitability. Following our January 2014 acquisition of the approximately 41.5 percent interest in FCA US that we did not already own, we announced our Business Plan in May 2014. Our Business Plan includes a number of product initiatives designed to improve the quality of our product offerings and grow sales in existing markets and expand in new markets.

It generally takes two years or more to design and develop a new vehicle, and a number of factors may lengthen that schedule. Because of this product development cycle and the various elements that may contribute to consumers’ acceptance of new vehicle designs, including competitors’ product introductions, fuel prices, general economic conditions and changes in styling preferences, an initial product concept or design that we believe will be attractive may not result in a vehicle that will generate sales in sufficient quantities and at high enough prices to be profitable. A failure to develop and offer innovative products that compare favorably to those of our principal competitors, in terms of price, quality, functionality and features, with particular regard to the upper-end of the product range, or delays in bringing strategic new models to the market, could impair our strategy, which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Additionally, our high proportion of fixed costs, both due to our significant investment in property, plant and equipment as well as the requirements of our collective bargaining agreements, which limit our flexibility to adjust personnel costs to changes in demand for our products, may further exacerbate the risks associated with incorrectly assessing demand for our vehicles.       

Further, if we determine that a safety or emissions defect, a mechanical defect or a non-compliance with regulation exists with respect to a vehicle model prior to the retail launch, the launch of such vehicle could be delayed until we remedy the defect or non-compliance. The costs associated with any protracted delay in new model launches necessary to remedy such defect, and the cost of providing a free remedy for such defects or non-compliance in vehicles that have been sold, could be substantial.

The automotive industry is highly competitive and cyclical and we may suffer from those factors more than some of our competitors.

Substantially all of our revenues are generated in the automotive industry, which is highly competitive, encompassing the production and distribution of passenger cars, light commercial vehicles and components and production systems. We face competition from other international passenger car and light commercial vehicle manufacturers and distributors and components suppliers in Europe, North America, Latin America and the Asia Pacific region. These markets are all highly competitive in terms of product quality, innovation, pricing, fuel economy, reliability, safety, customer service and financial services offered, and many of our competitors are better capitalized with larger market shares.

Competition, particularly in pricing, has increased significantly in the automotive industry in recent years. Global vehicle production capacity significantly exceeds current demand, partly as a result of lower growth in demand for vehicles. This overcapacity, combined with high levels of competition and weakness of major economies, has intensified and may further intensify pricing pressures.

Our competitors may respond to these conditions by attempting to make their vehicles more attractive or less expensive to customers by adding vehicle enhancements, providing subsidized financing or leasing programs, or by reducing vehicle prices whether directly or by offering option package discounts, price rebates or other sales incentives in certain markets. These actions have had, and could continue to have, a negative impact on our vehicle pricing, market share, and results of operations.

In the automotive business, sales to end-customers are cyclical and subject to changes in the general condition of the economy, the readiness of end-customers to buy and their ability to obtain financing, as well as the possible introduction of measures by governments to stimulate demand. The automotive industry is also subject to the constant renewal of product offerings through frequent launches of new models. A negative trend in the automotive industry or our inability to adapt effectively to external market conditions coupled with more limited capital than many of our principal competitors could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our current credit rating is below investment grade and any further deterioration may significantly affect our funding and prospects.

The ability to access the capital markets or other forms of financing and the related costs depend, among other things, on our credit ratings. Following downgrades by the major rating agencies, we are currently rated below investment grade. The rating agencies review these ratings regularly and, accordingly, new ratings may be assigned to us in the future. It is not currently possible to predict the timing or outcome of any ratings review. Any downgrade may increase our cost of capital and potentially limit our access to sources of financing, which may cause a material adverse effect on our business prospects, earnings and financial position. Since the ratings agencies may separately review and rate FCA US on a stand-alone basis, it is possible that our credit ratings may not benefit from any improvements in FCA US’s credit ratings or that a deterioration in FCA US’s credit ratings could result in a negative rating review of us. See Liquidity and Capital Resources for more information on our financing arrangements.

We may not be able to realize anticipated benefits from any acquisitions and challenges associated with strategic alliances may have an adverse impact on our results of operations.

We may engage in acquisitions or enter into, expand or exit from strategic alliances which could involve risks that may prevent us from realizing the expected benefits of the transactions or achieving our strategic objectives. Such risks could include:

  • technological and product synergies, economies of scale and cost reductions not occurring as expected;
  • unexpected liabilities;
  • incompatibility in processes or systems;
  • unexpected changes in laws or regulations;
  • inability to retain key employees;
  • inability to source certain products;
  • increased financing costs and inability to fund such costs;
  • significant costs associated with terminating or modifying alliances; and
  • problems in retaining customers and integrating operations, services, personnel, and customer bases.

If problems or issues were to arise among the parties to one or more strategic alliances for managerial, financial or other reasons, or if such strategic alliances or other relationships were terminated, our product lines, businesses, financial position and results of operations could be adversely affected.

We may not achieve the expected benefits from our integration of the Group’s operations.

The January 2014 acquisition of the approximately 41.5 percent interest in FCA US we did not already own and the related integration of the two businesses is intended to provide us with a number of long-term benefits, including allowing new vehicle platforms and powertrain technologies to be shared across a larger volume, as well as procurement benefits and global distribution opportunities, particularly the extension of brands into new markets. The integration is also intended to facilitate penetration of key brands in several international markets where we believe products would be attractive to consumers, but where we currently do not have significant market penetration.

The ability to realize the benefits of the integration is critical for us to compete with other automakers. If we are unable to convert the opportunities presented by the integration into long-term commercial benefits, either by improving sales of vehicles and service parts, reducing costs or both, our financial condition and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

We may be exposed to shortfalls in our pension plans.

Our defined benefit pension plans are currently underfunded. As of December 31, 2014, our defined benefit pension plans were underfunded by approximately €5.1 billion (€4.8 billion of which relates to FCA US’s defined benefit pension plans). Our pension funding obligations may increase significantly if the investment performance of plan assets does not keep pace with benefit payment obligations. Mandatory funding obligations may increase because of lower than anticipated returns on plan assets, whether as a result of overall weak market performance or particular investment decisions, changes in the level of interest rates used to determine required funding levels, changes in the level of benefits provided for by the plans, or any changes in applicable law related to funding requirements. Our defined benefit plans currently hold significant investments in equity and fixed income securities, as well as investments in less liquid instruments such as private equity, real estate and certain hedge funds. Due to the complexity and magnitude of certain investments, additional risks may exist, including significant changes in investment policy, insufficient market capacity to complete a particular investment strategy and an inherent divergence in objectives between the ability to manage risk in the short term and the ability to quickly rebalance illiquid and long-term investments.

To determine the appropriate level of funding and contributions to our defined benefit plans, as well as the investment strategy for the plans, we are required to make various assumptions, including an expected rate of return on plan assets and a discount rate used to measure the obligations under defined benefit pension plans. Interest rate increases generally will result in a decline in the value of investments in fixed income securities and the present value of the obligations. Conversely, interest rate decreases will generally increase the value of investments in fixed income securities and the present value of the obligations.

Any reduction in the discount rate or the value of plan assets, or any increase in the present value of obligations, may increase our pension expenses and required contributions and, as a result, could constrain liquidity and materially adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. If we fail to make required minimum funding contributions, we could be subject to reportable event disclosure to the U.S. Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, as well as interest and excise taxes calculated based upon the amount of any funding deficiency. With our ownership in FCA US now equal to 100 percent, we may become subject to certain U.S. legal requirements making us secondarily responsible for a funding shortfall in certain of FCA US’s pension plans in the event these pension plans were terminated and FCA US were to become insolvent. 

We may not be able to provide adequate access to financing for our dealers and retail customers.

Our dealers enter into wholesale financing arrangements to purchase vehicles from us to hold in inventory and facilitate retail sales, and retail customers use a variety of finance and lease programs to acquire vehicles.

Unlike many of our competitors, we do not own and operate a controlled finance company dedicated solely to our mass-market operations in the U.S. and certain key markets in Europe. Instead we have elected to partner with specialized financial services providers through joint ventures and commercial agreements. Our lack of a controlled finance company in these key markets may increase the risk that our dealers and retail customers will not have access to sufficient financing on acceptable terms which may adversely affect our vehicle sales in the future. Furthermore, many of our competitors are better able to implement financing programs designed to maximize vehicle sales in a manner that optimizes profitability for them and their finance companies on an aggregate basis. Since our ability to compete depends on access to appropriate sources of financing for dealers and retail customers, our lack of a controlled finance company in those markets could adversely affect our results of operations.

In other markets, we rely on controlled finance companies, joint ventures and commercial relationships with third parties, including third party financial institutions, to provide financing to our dealers and retail customers. Finance companies are subject to various risks that could negatively affect their ability to provide financing services at competitive rates, including:

  • the performance of loans and leases in their portfolio, which could be materially affected by delinquencies, defaults or prepayments;
  • wholesale auction values of used vehicles;
  • higher than expected vehicle return rates and the residual value performance of vehicles they lease; and
  • fluctuations in interest rates and currency exchange rates.

Any financial services provider, including our joint ventures and controlled finance companies, will face other demands on its capital, including the need or desire to satisfy funding requirements for dealers or customers of our competitors as well as liquidity issues relating to other investments. Furthermore, they may be subject to regulatory changes that may increase their costs, which may impair their ability to provide competitive financing products to our dealers and retail customers.

To the extent that a financial services provider is unable or unwilling to provide sufficient financing at competitive rates to our dealers and retail customers, such dealers and retail customers may not have sufficient access to financing to purchase or lease our vehicles. As a result, our vehicle sales and market share may suffer, which would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Vehicle sales depend heavily on affordable interest rates for vehicle financing.

In certain regions, financing for new vehicle sales has been available at relatively low interest rates for several years due to, among other things, expansive government monetary policies. To the extent that interest rates rise generally, market rates for new vehicle financing are expected to rise as well, which may make our vehicles less affordable to retail customers or steer consumers to less expensive vehicles that tend to be less profitable for us, adversely affecting our financial condition and results of operations. Additionally, if consumer interest rates increase substantially or if financial service providers tighten lending standards or restrict their lending to certain classes of credit, our retail customers may not desire to or be able to obtain financing to purchase or lease our vehicles. Furthermore, because our customers may be relatively more sensitive to changes in the availability and adequacy of financing and macroeconomic conditions, our vehicle sales may be disproportionately affected by changes in financing conditions relative to the vehicle sales of our competitors.

Limitations on our liquidity and access to funding may limit our ability to execute our Business Plan and improve our financial condition and results of operations.

Our future performance will depend on, among other things, our ability to finance debt repayment obligations and planned investments from operating cash flow, available liquidity, the renewal or refinancing of existing bank loans and/or facilities and possible access to capital markets or other sources of financing. Although we have measures in place that are designed to ensure that adequate levels of working capital and liquidity are maintained, declines in sales volumes could have a negative impact on the cash-generating capacity of our operating activities. For a discussion of these factors, see Liquidity and Capital Resources . We could, therefore, find ourselves in the position of having to seek additional financing and/or having to refinance existing debt, including in unfavorable market conditions, with limited availability of funding and a general increase in funding costs. Any limitations on our liquidity, due to decreases in vehicle sales, the amount of or restrictions in our existing indebtedness, conditions in the credit markets, general economic conditions or otherwise, may adversely impact our ability to execute our Business Plan and impair our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, any actual or perceived limitations of our liquidity may limit the ability or willingness of counterparties, including dealers, customers, suppliers and financial service providers, to do business with us, which may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Our ability to achieve cost reductions and to realize production efficiencies is critical to maintaining our competitiveness and long-term profitability.

We are continuing to implement a number of cost reduction and productivity improvement initiatives in our operations, for example, by increasing the number of vehicles that are based on common platforms, reducing dependence on sales incentives offered to dealers and consumers, leveraging purchasing capacity and volumes and implementing World Class Manufacturing, or WCM, principles. WCM principles are intended to eliminate waste of all types, and improve worker efficiency, productivity, safety and vehicle quality as well as worker flexibility and focus on removing capacity bottlenecks to maximize output when market demand requires without having to resort to significant capital investments. As part of our Business Plan, we plan to continue our efforts to extend our WCM programs into all of our production facilities and benchmark across all of our facilities around the world. Our future success depends upon our ability to implement these initiatives successfully throughout our operations. While some productivity improvements are within our control, others depend on external factors, such as commodity prices, supply capacity limitations, or trade regulation. These external factors may make it more difficult to reduce costs as planned, and we may sustain larger than expected production expenses, materially affecting our business and results of operations. Furthermore, reducing costs may prove difficult due to the need to introduce new and improved products in order to meet consumer expectations.         

Our business operations may be impacted by various types of claims, lawsuits, and other contingent obligations.

We are involved in various product liability, warranty, product performance, asbestos, personal injury, environmental claims and lawsuits, governmental investigations, antitrust, intellectual property, tax and other legal proceedings including those that arise in the ordinary course of our business. We estimate such potential claims and contingent liabilities and, where appropriate, record provisions to address these contingent liabilities. The ultimate outcome of the legal matters pending against us is uncertain, and although such claims, lawsuits and other legal matters are not expected individually to have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations, such matters could have, in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. Furthermore, we could, in the future, be subject to judgments or enter into settlements of lawsuits and claims that could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations in any particular period. While we maintain insurance coverage with respect to certain claims, we may not be able to obtain such insurance on acceptable terms in the future, if at all, and any such insurance may not provide adequate coverage against any such claims. See also Notes 26 and 33 of the Consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report for additional information.

Failure to maintain adequate financial and management processes and controls could lead to errors in our financial reporting, which could harm our business reputation and cause a default under certain covenants in our credit agreements and other debt.

We continuously monitor and evaluate changes in our internal controls over financial reporting. In support of our drive toward common global systems, we are extending the current finance, procurement, and capital project and investment management systems to new areas of operations. As appropriate, we continue to modify the design and documentation of internal control processes and procedures relating to the new systems to simplify and automate many of our previous processes. Our management believes that the implementation of these systems will continue to improve and enhance internal controls over financial reporting. Failure to maintain adequate financial and management processes and controls could lead to errors in our financial reporting, which could harm our business reputation.

In addition, if we do not maintain adequate financial and management personnel, processes and controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial performance on a timely basis, which could cause a default under certain covenants in the indentures governing certain of our public indebtedness, and other credit agreements.

A disruption in our information technology could compromise confidential and sensitive information.

We depend on our information technology and data processing systems to operate our business, and a significant malfunction or disruption in the operation of our systems, or a security breach that compromises the confidential and sensitive information stored in those systems, could disrupt our business and adversely impact our ability to compete.

Our ability to keep our business operating effectively depends on the functional and efficient operation of our information, data processing and telecommunications systems, including our vehicle design, manufacturing, inventory tracking and billing and payment systems. We rely on these systems to make a variety of day-to-day business decisions as well as to track transactions, billings, payments and inventory. Such systems are susceptible to malfunctions and interruptions due to equipment damage, power outages, and a range of other hardware, software and network problems. Those systems are also susceptible to cybercrime, or threats of intentional disruption, which are increasing in terms of sophistication and frequency. For any of these reasons, we may experience systems malfunctions or interruptions. Although our systems are diversified, including multiple server locations and a range of software applications for different regions and functions, and we are currently undergoing an effort to assess and ameliorate risks to our systems, a significant or large-scale malfunction or interruption of any one of our computer or data processing systems could adversely affect our ability to manage and keep our operations running efficiently, and damage our reputation if we are unable to track transactions and deliver products to our dealers and customers.

A malfunction that results in a wider or sustained disruption to our business could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition to supporting our operations, we use our systems to collect and store confidential and sensitive data, including information about our business, our customers and our employees. As our technology continues to evolve, we anticipate that we will collect and store even more data in the future, and that our systems will increasingly use remote communication features that are sensitive to both willful and unintentional security breaches. Much of our value is derived from our confidential business information, including vehicle design, proprietary technology and trade secrets, and to the extent the confidentiality of such information is compromised, we may lose our competitive advantage and our vehicle sales may suffer. We also collect, retain and use personal information, including data we gather from customers for product development and marketing purposes, and data we obtain from employees. In the event of a breach in security that allows third parties access to this personal information, we are subject to a variety of ever-changing laws on a global basis that require us to provide notification to the data owners, and that subject us to lawsuits, fines and other means of regulatory enforcement. Our reputation could suffer in the event of such a data breach, which could cause consumers to purchase their vehicles from our competitors. Ultimately, any significant compromise in the integrity of our data security could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property rights, which may harm our business.

Our success depends, in part, on our ability to protect our intellectual property rights. If we fail to protect our intellectual property rights, others may be able to compete against us using intellectual property that is the same as or similar to our own. In addition, there can be no guarantee that our intellectual property rights are sufficient to provide us with a competitive advantage against others who offer products similar to ours. Despite our efforts, we may be unable to prevent third parties from infringing our intellectual property and using our technology for their competitive advantage. Any such infringement and use could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

The laws of some countries in which we operate do not offer the same protection of our intellectual property rights as do the laws of the U.S. or Europe. In addition, effective intellectual property enforcement may be unavailable or limited in certain countries, making it difficult for us to protect our intellectual property from misuse or infringement there. Our inability to protect our intellectual property rights in some countries may harm our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We are subject to risks relating to international markets and exposure to changes in local conditions.

We are subject to risks inherent to operating globally, including those related to:

  • exposure to local economic and political conditions;
  • import and/or export restrictions;
  • multiple tax regimes, including regulations relating to transfer pricing and withholding and other taxes on remittances and other payments to or from subsidiaries;
  • foreign investment and/or trade restrictions or requirements, foreign exchange controls and restrictions on the repatriation of funds. In particular, current regulations limit our ability to access and transfer liquidity out of Venezuela to meet demands in other countries and also subject us to increased risk of devaluation or other foreign exchange losses. See Subsequent events and 2015 outlook for more information regarding our Venezuela operations; and
  • the introduction of more stringent laws and regulations.

Unfavorable developments in any one or a combination of these areas (which may vary from country to country) could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our success largely depends on the ability of our current management team to operate and manage effectively.

Our success largely depends on the ability of our senior executives and other members of management to effectively manage the Group and individual areas of the business. In particular, our Chief Executive Officer, Sergio Marchionne, is critical to the execution of our new strategic direction and implementation of the Business Plan. Although Mr. Marchionne has indicated his intention to remain as our Chief Executive Officer through the period of our Business Plan, if we were to lose his services or those of any of our other senior executives or key employees it could have a material adverse effect on our business prospects, earnings and financial position. We have developed succession plans that we believe are appropriate in the circumstances, although it is difficult to predict with any certainty that we will replace these individuals with persons of equivalent experience and capabilities. If we are unable to find adequate replacements or to attract, retain and incentivize senior executives, other key employees or new qualified personnel our business, financial condition and results of operations may suffer.

Developments in emerging market countries may adversely affect our business.

We operate in a number of emerging markets, both directly (e.g., Brazil and Argentina) and through joint ventures and other cooperation agreements (e.g., Turkey, India, China and Russia). Our Business Plan provides for expansion of our existing sales and manufacturing presence in our South and Central America, or LATAM, and Asia and Pacific countries, or APAC, regions. In recent years we have been the market leader in Brazil, which has provided a key contribution to our financial performance. Our exposure to other emerging countries has increased in recent years, as have the number and importance of such joint ventures and cooperation agreements. Economic and political developments in Brazil and other emerging markets, including economic crises or political instability, have had and could have in the future material adverse effects on our financial condition and results of operations. Further, in certain markets in which we or our joint ventures operate, government approval may be required for certain activities, which may limit our ability to act quickly in making decisions on our operations in those markets.

Maintaining and strengthening our position in these emerging markets is a key component of our global growth strategy in our Business Plan. However, with competition from many of the largest global manufacturers as well as numerous smaller domestic manufacturers, the automotive market in these emerging markets is highly competitive. As these markets continue to grow, we anticipate that additional competitors, both international and domestic, will seek to enter these markets and that existing market participants will try to aggressively protect or increase their market share. Increased competition may result in price reductions, reduced margins and our inability to gain or hold market share, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our reliance on joint ventures in certain emerging markets may adversely affect the development of our business in those regions.

We intend to expand our presence in emerging markets, including China and India, through partnerships and joint ventures. For instance, we have entered into a joint venture with Guangzhou Automobile Group Co., Ltd, or GAC Group, which will localize production of three new Jeep vehicles for the Chinese market and expand the portfolio of Jeep Sport Utility Vehicles, or SUVs, currently available to Chinese consumers as imports. We have also entered into a joint venture with TATA Motors Limited for the production of certain of our vehicles, engines and transmissions in India.

Our reliance on joint ventures to enter or expand our presence in these markets may expose us to risk of conflict with our joint venture partners and the need to divert management resources to overseeing these shareholder arrangements. Further, as these arrangements require cooperation with third party partners, these joint ventures may not be able to make decisions as quickly as we would if we were operating on our own or may take actions that are different from what we would do on a standalone basis in light of the need to consider our partners’ interests.
As a result, we may be less able to respond timely to changes in market dynamics, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.       

Laws, regulations and governmental policies, including those regarding increased fuel economy requirements and reduced greenhouse gas emissions, may have a significant effect on how we do business and may adversely affect our results of operations.

In order to comply with government regulations related to fuel economy and emissions standards, we must devote significant financial and management resources, as well as vehicle engineering and design attention, to these legal requirements. We expect the number and scope of these regulatory requirements, along with the costs associated with compliance, to increase significantly in the future and these costs could be difficult to pass through to customers. As a result, we may face limitations on the types of vehicles we produce and sell and where we can sell them, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.

Government initiatives to stimulate consumer demand for products sold by us, such as changes in tax treatment or purchase incentives for new vehicles, can substantially influence the timing and level of our revenues. The size and duration of such government measures are unpredictable and outside of our control. Any adverse change in government policy relating to those measures could have material adverse effects on our business prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

The financial resources required to develop and commercialize vehicles incorporating sustainable technologies for the future are significant, as are the barriers that limit the mass-market potential of such vehicles.

Our product strategy is driven by the objective of achieving sustainable mobility by reducing the environmental impact of vehicles over their entire life cycle. We therefore intend to continue investing capital resources to develop new sustainable technology. We aim to increase the use of alternative fuels, such as natural gas, by continuing to offer a range of dual-fuel passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Additionally, we plan to continue developing alternative propulsion systems, particularly for vehicles driven in urban areas (such as the zero-emission Fiat 500e).

In many cases, technological and cost barriers limit the mass-market potential of sustainable natural gas and electric vehicles. In certain other cases the technologies that we plan to employ are not yet commercially practical and depend on significant future technological advances by us and by suppliers. There can be no assurance that these advances will occur in a timely or feasible manner, that the funds we have budgeted or expended for these purposes will be adequate, or that we will be able to obtain rights to use these technologies. Further, our competitors and others are pursuing similar technologies and other competing technologies and there can be no assurance that they will not acquire similar or superior technologies sooner than we will or on an exclusive basis or at a significant price advantage. 

Labor laws and collective bargaining agreements with our labor unions could impact our ability to increase the efficiency of our operations.

Substantially all of our production employees are represented by trade unions, are covered by collective bargaining agreements and/or are protected by applicable labor relations regulations that may restrict our ability to modify operations and reduce costs quickly in response to changes in market conditions. These and other provisions in our collective bargaining agreements may impede our ability to restructure our business successfully to compete more effectively, especially with those automakers whose employees are not represented by trade unions or are subject to less stringent regulations, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. 

We depend on our relationships with suppliers.

We purchase raw materials and components from a large number of suppliers and depend on services and products provided by companies outside the Group. Close collaboration between an original equipment manufacturer, or OEM, and its suppliers is common in the automotive industry, and although this offers economic benefits in terms of cost reduction, it also means that we depend on our suppliers and are exposed to the possibility that difficulties, including those of a financial nature, experienced by those suppliers (whether caused by internal or external factors) could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We face risks associated with increases in costs, disruptions of supply or shortages of raw materials.

We use a variety of raw materials in our business including steel, aluminum, lead, resin and copper, and precious metals such as platinum, palladium and rhodium, as well as energy. The prices for these raw materials fluctuate, and market conditions can affect our ability to manage our cost of sales over the short term. We seek to manage this exposure, but we may not be successful in managing our exposure to these risks. Substantial increases in the prices for raw materials would increase our operating costs and could reduce profitability if the increased costs cannot be offset by changes in vehicle prices or countered by productivity gains. In particular, certain raw materials are sourced from a limited number of suppliers and from a limited number of countries. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to maintain arrangements with these suppliers that assure access to these raw materials, and in some cases this access may be affected by factors outside of our control and the control of our suppliers. For instance, natural or man-made disasters or civil unrest may have severe and unpredictable effects on the price of certain raw materials in the future.

As with raw materials, we are also at risk for supply disruption and shortages in parts and components for use in our vehicles for many reasons including, but not limited to, tight credit markets or other financial distress, natural or man- made disasters, or production difficulties. We will continue to work with suppliers to monitor potential disruptions and shortages and to mitigate the effects of any emerging shortages on our production volumes and revenues.

However, there can be no assurances that these events will not have an adverse effect on our production in the future, and any such effect may be material.

Any interruption in the supply or any increase in the cost of raw materials, parts, components and systems could negatively impact our ability to achieve our vehicle sales objectives and profitability. Long-term interruptions in supply of raw materials, parts, components and systems may result in a material impact on vehicle production, vehicle sales objectives, and profitability. Cost increases which cannot be recouped through increases in vehicle prices, or countered by productivity gains, may result in a material impact on our financial condition and/or results of operations.

We are subject to risks associated with exchange rate fluctuations, interest rate changes, credit risk and other market risks.

We operate in numerous markets worldwide and are exposed to market risks stemming from fluctuations in currency and interest rates. The exposure to currency risk is mainly linked to the differences in geographic distribution of our manufacturing activities and commercial activities, resulting in cash flows from sales being denominated in currencies different from those connected to purchases or production activities.

We use various forms of financing to cover funding requirements for our industrial activities and for providing financing to our dealers and customers. Moreover, liquidity for industrial activities is also principally invested in variable-rate or short-term financial instruments. Our financial services businesses normally operate a matching policy to offset the impact of differences in rates of interest on the financed portfolio and related liabilities. Nevertheless, changes in interest rates can affect net revenues, finance costs and margins.

We seek to manage risks associated with fluctuations in currency and interest rates through financial hedging instruments. Despite such hedges being in place, fluctuations in currency or interest rates could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. For example, the weakening of the Brazilian Real against the Euro in 2014 impacted the results of operations of our LATAM segment. See Operating Results—Results of Operations.

Our financial services activities are also subject to the risk of insolvency of dealers and retail customers, as well as unfavorable economic conditions in markets where these activities are carried out. Despite our efforts to mitigate such risks through the credit approval policies applied to dealers and retail customers, there can be no assurances that we will be able to successfully mitigate such risks, particularly with respect to a general change in economic conditions.

We are a Dutch public company with limited liability, and our shareholders may have rights different from those of shareholders of companies organized in the U.S.

The rights of our shareholders may be different from the rights of shareholders governed by the laws of U.S. jurisdictions. We are a Dutch public company with limited liability (naamloze vennootsehap). Our corporate affairs are governed by our articles of association and by the laws governing companies incorporated in the Netherlands.

The rights of shareholders and the responsibilities of members of our board of directors may be different from the rights of shareholders and the responsibilities of members of our board of directors in companies governed by the laws of other jurisdictions including the U.S. In the performance of its duties, our board of directors is required by Dutch law to consider our interests and the interests of our shareholders, our employees and other stakeholders, in all cases with due observation of the principles of reasonableness and fairness. It is possible that some of these parties will have interests that are different from, or in addition to, your interests as a shareholder. 

It may be difficult to enforce U.S. judgments against us.

We are organized under the laws of the Netherlands, and a substantial portion of our assets are outside of the U.S. Most of our directors and senior management and our independent auditors are resident outside the U.S., and all or a substantial portion of their respective assets may be located outside the U.S. As a result, it may be difficult for U.S. investors to effect service of process within the U.S. upon these persons. It may also be difficult for U.S. investors to enforce within the U.S. judgments predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the U.S. or any state thereof. In addition, there is uncertainty as to whether the courts outside the U.S. would recognize or enforce judgments of U.S. courts obtained against us or our directors and officers predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the U.S. or any state thereof. Therefore, it may be difficult to enforce U.S. judgments against us, our directors and officers and our independent auditors.

We operate so as to be treated as exclusively resident in the United Kingdom for tax purposes, but the relevant tax authorities may treat us as also being tax resident elsewhere.

We are not a company incorporated in the United Kingdom, or U.K. Therefore, whether we are resident in the U.K. for tax purposes will depend on whether our “central management and control” is located (in whole or in part) in the U.K. The test of “central management and control” is largely a question of fact and degree based on all the circumstances, rather than a question of law. Nevertheless, the decisions of the U.K. courts and the published practice of Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs, or HMRC, suggest that we, a group holding company, are likely to be regarded as having become U.K.-resident on this basis from incorporation and remaining so if, as we intend, (i) at least half of the meetings of our Board of Directors are held in the U.K. with a majority of directors present in the U.K. for those meetings; (ii) at those meetings there are full discussions of, and decisions are made regarding, the key strategic issues affecting us and our subsidiaries; (iii) those meetings are properly minuted; (iv) at least some of our directors, together with supporting staff, are based in the U.K.; and (v) we have permanent staffed office premises in the U.K.

Even if we are resident in the U.K. for tax purposes on this basis, as expected, we would nevertheless not be treated as U.K.-resident if (a) we were concurrently resident in another jurisdiction (applying the tax residence rules of that jurisdiction) that has a double tax treaty with the U.K. and (b) there is a tie-breaker provision in that tax treaty which allocates exclusive residence to that other jurisdiction.

Our residence for Italian tax purposes is largely a question of fact based on all circumstances. A rebuttable presumption of residence in Italy may apply under Article 73(5-bis) of the Italian Consolidated Tax Act, or CTA. However, we have set up and thus far maintained, and intend to continue to maintain, our management and organizational structure in such a manner that we should be deemed resident in the U.K. from our incorporation for the purposes of the Italy-U.K. tax treaty. The result of this is that we should not be regarded as an Italian tax resident either for the purposes of the Italy-U.K. tax treaty or for Italian domestic law purposes. Because this analysis is highly factual and may depend on future changes in our management and organizational structure, there can be no assurance regarding the final determination of our tax residence. Should we be treated as an Italian tax resident, we would be subject to taxation in Italy on our worldwide income and may be required to comply with withholding tax and/or reporting obligations provided under Italian tax law, which could result in additional costs and expenses.

Even if our “central management and control” is in the U.K. as expected, we will be resident in the Netherlands for Dutch corporate income tax and Dutch dividend withholding tax purposes on the basis that we are incorporated there. Nonetheless, we will be regarded as solely resident in either the U.K. or the Netherlands under the Netherlands-U.K. tax treaty if the U.K. and Dutch competent authorities agree that this is the case. We have applied for a ruling from the U.K. and Dutch competent authorities that we should be treated as resident solely in the U.K. for the purposes of the treaty. The outcome of that application cannot be guaranteed and it is possible that the U.K. and Dutch competent authorities may fail to reach an agreement. We anticipate, however, that, so long as the factors listed in the third preceding paragraph are present at all material times, the possibility that the U.K. and Dutch competent authorities will rule that we should be treated as solely resident in the Netherlands is remote. If there is a change over time to the facts upon which a ruling issued by the competent authorities is based, the ruling may be withdrawn or cease to apply.

We therefore expect to continue to be treated as resident in the U.K. and subject to U.K. corporation tax.

Unless and until the U.K. and the Dutch competent authorities rule that we should be treated as solely resident in the U.K. for the purposes of the Netherlands-U.K. double tax treaty, the Netherlands will be allowed to levy tax on us as a Dutch-tax-resident taxpayer. 

The U.K.’s controlled foreign company taxation rules may reduce net returns to shareholders.

On the assumption that we are resident for tax purposes in the U.K., we will be subject to the U.K. controlled foreign company, or CFC, rules. The CFC rules can subject U.K.-tax-resident companies (in this case, us) to U.K. tax on the profits of certain companies not resident for tax purposes in the U.K. in which they have at least a 25 percent direct or indirect interest. Interests of connected or associated persons may be aggregated with those of the U.K.-tax-resident company when applying this 25 percent threshold. For a company to be a CFC, it must be treated as directly or indirectly controlled by persons resident for tax purposes in the U.K. The definition of control is broad (it includes economic rights) and captures some joint ventures.

Various exemptions are available. One of these is that a CFC must be subject to tax in its territory of residence at an effective rate not less than 75 percent of the rate to which it would be subject in the U.K., after making specified adjustments. Another of the exemptions (the “excluded territories exemption”) is that the CFC is resident in a jurisdiction specified by HMRC in regulations (several jurisdictions in which our group has significant operations, including Brazil, Italy and the U.S., are so specified). For this exemption to be available, the CFC must not be involved in an arrangement with a main purpose of avoiding U.K. tax and the CFC’s income falling within certain categories (often referred to as the CFC’s “bad income”) must not exceed a set limit. In the case of the U.S. and certain other countries, the “bad income” test need not be met if the CFC does not have a permanent establishment in any other territory and the CFC or persons with an interest in it are subject to tax in its home jurisdiction on all its income (other than non-deductible distributions). We expect that our principal operating activities should fall within one or more of the exemptions from the CFC rules, in particular the excluded territories exemption.

Where the entity exemptions are not available, profits from activities other than finance or insurance will only be subject to apportionment under the CFC rules where:

  • some of the CFC’s assets or risks are acquired, managed or controlled to any significant extent in the U.K.(a) other than by a U.K. permanent establishment of the CFC and (b) other than under arm’s length arrangements;
  • the CFC could not manage the assets or risks itself; and
  • the CFC is party to arrangements which increase its profits while reducing tax payable in the U.K. and the arrangements would not have been made if they were not expected to reduce tax in some jurisdiction.

Profits from finance activities (whether considered trading or non-trading profits for U.K. tax purposes) or from insurance may be subject to apportionment under the CFC rules if they meet the tests set out above or specific tests for those activities. A full or 75 percent exemption may also be available for some non-trading finance profits.

Although we do not expect the U.K.’s CFC rules to have a material adverse impact on our financial position, the effect of the new CFC rules on us is not yet certain. We will continue to monitor developments in this regard and seek to mitigate any adverse U.K. tax implications which may arise. However, the possibility cannot be excluded that the CFC rules may have a material adverse impact on our financial position, reducing net returns to our shareholders.

The existence of a permanent establishment in Italy for us after the Merger is a question of fact based on all the circumstances.

Whether we have maintained a permanent establishment in Italy after the Merger, or an Italian P.E., is largely a question of fact based on all the circumstances. We believe that, on the understanding that we should be a U.K.-resident company under the Italy-U.K. tax treaty, we are likely to be treated as maintaining an Italian P.E. because we have maintained and intend to continue to maintain sufficient employees, facilities and activities in Italy to qualify as maintaining an Italian P.E. Should this be the case (i) the embedded gains on our assets connected with the Italian P.E. cannot be taxed as a result of the Merger; (ii) our tax-deferred reserves cannot be taxed, inasmuch as they have been recorded in the Italian P.E.’s financial accounts; and (iii) the Italian fiscal unit that was headed by Fiat before the Merger, or Fiscal Unit, continues with respect to our Italian subsidiaries whose shareholdings are part of the Italian P.E.’s net worth.

According to Article 124(5) of the CTA, a mandatory ruling request should be submitted to the Italian tax authorities, in order to ensure the continuity, via the Italian P.E., of the Fiscal Unit that was previously in place between Fiat and its Italian subsidiaries. We filed a ruling request with the Italian tax authorities in respect of the continuation of the Fiscal Unit via the Italian P.E. on April 16, 2014. The Italian tax authorities issued the ruling on December 10, 2014, or the Ruling, confirming that the Fiscal Unit may continue via the Italian P.E. However, the Ruling is an interpretative ruling. It is not an assessment of a certain set of facts and circumstances. Therefore, even though the Ruling confirms that the Fiscal Unit may continue via the Italian P.E., this does not rule out that the Italian tax authorities may in the future verify whether we actually have a P.E. in Italy and potentially challenge the existence of such P.E. Because the analysis is highly factual, there can be no assurance regarding our maintenance of an Italian P.E. after the Merger.

Risks Related to Our Indebtedness

We have significant outstanding indebtedness, which may limit our ability to obtain additional funding on competitive terms and limit our financial and operating flexibility.

The extent of our indebtedness could have important consequences on our operations and financial results, including:

  • we may not be able to secure additional funds for working capital, capital expenditures, debt service requirements or general corporate purposes;
  • we may need to use a portion of our projected future cash flow from operations to pay principal and interest on our indebtedness, which may reduce the amount of funds available to us for other purposes;
  • we may be more financially leveraged than some of our competitors, which may put us at a competitive disadvantage; and
  • we may not be able to adjust rapidly to changing market conditions, which may make us more vulnerable to a downturn in general economic conditions or our business.

These risks may be exacerbated by volatility in the financial markets, particularly those resulting from perceived strains on the finances and creditworthiness of several governments and financial institutions, particularly in the Eurozone.

Even after the January 2014 acquisition of the approximately 41.5 percent interest in FCA US that we did not already own, FCA US continues to manage financial matters, including funding and cash management, separately. Additionally, we have not provided guarantees or security or undertaken any other similar commitment in relation to any financial obligation of FCA US, nor do we have any commitment to provide funding to FCA US in the future.

Furthermore, certain of our bonds include covenants that may be affected by FCA US’s circumstances. In particular, these bonds include cross-default clauses which may accelerate the relevant issuer’s obligation to repay its bonds in the event that FCA US fails to pay certain debt obligations on maturity or is otherwise subject to an acceleration in the maturity of any of those obligations. Therefore, these cross-default provisions could require early repayment of those bonds in the event FCA US’s debt obligations are accelerated or are not repaid at maturity. There can be no assurance that the obligation to accelerate the repayment by FCA US of its debts will not arise or that it will be able to pay its debt obligations when due at maturity.

In addition, one of our existing revolving credit facilities, expiring in July 2016, provides some limits on our ability to provide financial support to FCA US.           

Restrictive covenants in our debt agreements could limit our financial and operating flexibility.

The indentures governing certain of our outstanding public indebtedness, and other credit agreements to which companies in the Group are a party, contain covenants that restrict the ability of companies in the Group to, among other things:

  • incur additional debt; 
  • make certain investments;
  • enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates;
  • sell certain assets or merge with or into other companies;
  • use assets as security in other transactions; and
  • enter into sale and leaseback transactions.

For more information regarding our credit facilities and debt, see Liquidity and Capital Resources.

Restrictions arising out of FCA US’s debt instruments may hinder our ability to manage our operations on a consolidated, global basis.

FCA US is party to credit agreements for certain senior credit facilities and an indenture for two series of secured senior notes. These debt instruments include covenants that restrict FCA US’s ability to pay dividends or enter into sale and leaseback transactions, make certain distributions or purchase or redeem capital stock, prepay other debt, encumber assets, incur or guarantee additional indebtedness, incur liens, transfer and sell assets or engage in certain business combinations, enter into certain transactions with affiliates or undertake various other business activities.

In particular, in January 2014 and February 2015, FCA US paid distributions of U.S.$1.9 billion and U.S.$1.3 billion, respectively, to its members. Further distributions will be limited to 50 percent of FCA US’s cumulative consolidated net income (as defined in the agreements) from the period from January 1, 2012 until the end of the most recent fiscal quarter, less the amounts of the January 2014 and February 2015 distributions. SeeLiquidity and Capital Resources .

These restrictive covenants could have an adverse effect on our business by limiting our ability to take advantage of financing, mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures or other corporate opportunities. In particular, the senior credit facilities contain, and future indebtedness may contain, other and more restrictive covenants. These agreements also restrict FCA US from prepaying certain of its indebtedness or imposing limitations that make prepayment impractical. The senior credit facilities require FCA US to maintain borrowing base collateral coverage and a minimum liquidity threshold. A breach of any of these covenants or restrictions could result in an event of default on the indebtedness and the other indebtedness of FCA US or result in cross-default under certain of its or our indebtedness.

If FCA US is unable to comply with these covenants, its outstanding indebtedness may become due and payable and creditors may foreclose on pledged properties. In this case, FCA US may not be able to repay its debt and it is unlikely that it would be able to borrow sufficient additional funds. Even if new financing is made available to FCA US in such circumstances, it may not be available on acceptable terms.

Compliance with certain of these covenants could also restrict FCA US’s ability to take certain actions that its management believes are in FCA US’s and our best long-term interests.

Should FCA US be unable to undertake strategic initiatives due to the covenants provided for by the above-referenced instruments, our business prospects, financial condition and results of operations could be impacted.

No assurance can be given that restrictions arising out of FCA US’s debt instruments will be eliminated.

In connection with our capital planning to support the Business Plan, we have announced our intention to eliminate existing contractual terms limiting the free flow of capital among Group companies, including through the redemption of each series of FCA US’s outstanding secured senior notes no later than their optional redemption dates in June 2015 and 2016, as well as the refinancing of outstanding FCA US term loans and its revolving credit facility at or before this time. No assurance can be given regarding the timing of such transactions or that such transactions will be completed.

Substantially all of the assets of FCA US and its U.S. subsidiary guarantors are unconditionally pledged as security under its senior credit facilities and secured senior notes and could become subject to lenders’ contractual rights if an event of default were to occur.

FCA US and several of its U.S. subsidiaries are obligors or guarantors under FCA US’s senior credit facilities and secured senior notes. The obligations under the senior credit facilities and secured senior notes are secured by senior and junior priority, respectively, security interests in substantially all of the assets of FCA US and its U.S. subsidiary guarantors. The collateral includes 100 percent of the equity interests in FCA US’s U.S. subsidiaries, 65 percent of the equity interests in its non-U.S. subsidiaries held directly by FCA US and its U.S. subsidiary guarantors, all personal property and substantially all of FCA US’s U.S. real property other than its Auburn Hills, Michigan headquarters.

An event of default under FCA US’s senior credit facilities and/or secured senior notes could trigger its lenders’ or noteholders’ contractual rights to enforce their security interest in these assets.

Risks Relating to the Proposed Separation of Ferrari

No assurance can be given that the Ferrari separation will occur.

No assurance can be given as to whether and when the separation of Ferrari will occur. We may determine to delay or abandon the separation at any time for any reason or for no reason.

The terms of the proposed separation of Ferrari and Ferrari’s stand-alone capital structure have not been determined.

The terms of the proposed separation of Ferrari and Ferrari’s stand-alone capital structure have not yet been determined. However, the final structure and terms of the separation may not coincide with the terms set forth in this report. No assurance can be given as to the terms of the prospective interest in Ferrari or the terms of how it will be distributed.

We may be unable to achieve some or all of the benefits that we expect to achieve from our separation from Ferrari.

We may not be able to achieve the financial and other benefits that we expect will result from the separation of Ferrari. The anticipated benefits of the separation are based on a number of assumptions, some of which may prove incorrect. For example, there can be no assurance that the separation of Ferrari will enable us to strengthen our capital base sufficiently to offset the loss of the earnings and potential earnings of Ferrari.

Following the Ferrari separation, the price of our common shares may fluctuate significantly.

We cannot predict the prices at which our common shares may trade after the separation, the effect of the separation on the trading prices of our common shares or whether the market value of our common shares and the common shares of Ferrari held by a shareholder after the separation will be less than, equal to or greater than the market value of our common shares held by such shareholder prior to the separation.

We intend for the Ferrari separation to qualify as a generally tax-free distribution for our shareholders from a U.S. federal income tax perspective, and as a tax-free transaction from an Italian income tax perspective, but no assurance can be given that the separation will receive such tax-free treatment in the United States or in other jurisdictions.

It is our intention to structure the Ferrari separation and any spin-off to our shareholders in a tax efficient manner from a U.S. federal income tax perspective, taking appropriate account of the potential impact on shareholders, but no assurance can be given that the intended tax treatment will be achieved, or that shareholders, and/or persons that receive the benefit of Ferrari shares, will not incur substantial tax liabilities in connection with the separation and distribution. In particular, the requirements for favorable treatment differ (and may conflict) from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and the relevant requirements are often complex, and no assurance can be given that any ruling (or similar guidance) from any taxing authority would be sought or, if sought, granted. Following an initial public offering of a portion of our equity interest in Ferrari, we currently intend to spin-off our remaining equity interest in Ferrari to holders of our common shares and mandatory convertible securities (which we intend to treat as our stock for U.S. federal income tax purposes), and we currently intend for such spin-off to qualify as a generally tax-free distribution for holders of our stock for U.S. federal income tax purposes. However, the structure and terms of any distribution have not been determined and there can be no assurance that a distribution of Ferrari or any other spin-off would qualify as a tax-free distribution or that holders of our shares or mandatory convertible securities would not recognize gain for U.S. federal income tax purposes in connection with any such distribution or spin-off.

In addition, no assurance can be given that the Ferrari separation will not give rise to additional taxable income in Italy in the hands of the Italian P.E. of FCA. Depending on how large this additional taxable income is, it may or may not be fully offset by the current year or carried forward losses that the Fiscal Unit may use based on the Ruling.

In addition, no assurance can be given that our shareholders subject to Italian tax will not incur substantial Italian tax liabilities in connection with the Ferrari separation.

Risks Related to our Common Shares

Our maintenance of two exchange listings may adversely affect liquidity in the market for our common shares and could result in pricing differentials of our common shares between the two exchanges.

Shortly following the closing of the Merger and the listing of our common shares on the New York Stock Exchange, or NYSE, we listed our common shares on the Mercato Telematico Azionario, or MTA. The dual listing of our common shares may split trading between the two markets and adversely affect the liquidity of the shares in one or both markets and the development of an active trading market for our common shares on the NYSE and may result in price differentials between the exchanges. Differences in the trading schedules, as well as volatility in the exchange rate of the two trading currencies, among other factors, may result in different trading prices for our common shares on the two exchanges.

The loyalty voting structure may affect the liquidity of our common shares and reduce our common share price.

The implementation of the loyalty voting structure could reduce the liquidity of our common shares and adversely affect the trading prices of our common shares. The loyalty voting structure was intended to reward shareholders for maintaining long-term share ownership by granting initial shareholders and persons holding our common shares continuously for at least three years at any time following the effectiveness of the Merger the option to elect to receive our special voting shares. Our special voting shares cannot be traded and, immediately prior to the deregistration of common shares from the FCA Loyalty Register, any corresponding special voting shares shall be transferred to us for no consideration (om niet). This loyalty voting structure is designed to encourage a stable shareholder base and, conversely, it may deter trading by those shareholders who are interested in gaining or retaining our special voting shares. Therefore, the loyalty voting structure may reduce liquidity in our common shares and adversely affect their trading price. 

The loyalty voting structure may make it more difficult for shareholders to acquire a controlling interest, change our management or strategy or otherwise exercise influence over us, and the market price of our common shares may be lower as a result.

The provisions of our articles of association which establish the loyalty voting structure may make it more difficult for a third party to acquire, or attempt to acquire, control of our company, even if a change of control were considered favorably by shareholders holding a majority of our common shares. As a result of the loyalty voting structure, a relatively large proportion of our voting power could be concentrated in a relatively small number of shareholders who would have significant influence over us. As of February 27, 2015, Exor had a voting interest in FCA of approximately 44.31 percent due to its participation in the loyalty voting structure and as a result will have the ability to exercise significant influence on matters involving our shareholders. Such shareholders participating in the loyalty voting structure could effectively prevent change of control transactions that may otherwise benefit our shareholders. The loyalty voting structure may also prevent or discourage shareholders’ initiatives aimed at changing our management or strategy or otherwise exerting influence over us.

The loyalty voting structure may also prevent or discourage shareholders’ initiatives aimed at changes in our management.

There may be potential Passive Foreign Investment Company tax considerations for U.S. Shareholders.

Shares of our stock held by a U.S. holder would be stock of a passive foreign investment company, or a PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes with respect to a U.S. Shareholder if for any taxable year in which such U.S. Shareholder held our common shares, after the application of applicable look-through rules (i) 75 percent or more of our gross income for the taxable year consists of passive income (including dividends, interest, gains from the sale or exchange of investment property and rents and royalties other than rents and royalties which are received from unrelated parties in connection with the active conduct of a trade or business, as defined in applicable Treasury Regulations), or (ii) at least 50 percent of its assets for the taxable year (averaged over the year and determined based upon value) produce or are held for the production of passive income. U.S. persons who own shares of a PFIC are subject to a disadvantageous U.S. federal income tax regime with respect to the income derived by the PFIC, the dividends they receive from the PFIC, and the gain, if any, they derive from the sale or other disposition of their shares in the PFIC.

While we believe that shares of our stock are not stock of a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes, this conclusion is based on a factual determination made annually and thus is subject to change. Moreover, shares of our stock may become stock of a PFIC in future taxable years if there were to be changes in our assets, income or operations.

Tax consequences of the loyalty voting structure are uncertain.

No statutory, judicial or administrative authority directly discusses how the receipt, ownership, or disposition of special voting shares should be treated for Italian, U.K. or U.S. tax purposes and as a result, the tax consequences in those jurisdictions are uncertain.

The fair market value of our special voting shares, which may be relevant to the tax consequences, is a factual determination and is not governed by any guidance that directly addresses such a situation. Because, among other things, the special voting shares are not transferable (other than, in very limited circumstances, together with our associated common shares) and a shareholder will receive amounts in respect of the special voting shares only if we are liquidated, we believe and intend to take the position that the fair market value of each special voting share is minimal. However, the relevant tax authorities could assert that the value of the special voting shares as determined by us is incorrect.

The tax treatment of the loyalty voting structure is unclear and shareholders are urged to consult their tax advisors in respect of the consequences of acquiring, owning and disposing of special voting shares.

Tax may be required to be withheld from dividend payments.

Unless and until the U.K. and the Dutch competent authorities rule that we should be treated as solely resident in the U.K. for the purposes of the Netherlands-U.K. double tax treaty, dividends distributed by us will be subject to Dutch dividend withholding tax (subject to any relief which may be available under Dutch law or the terms of any applicable double tax treaty) and we will be under no obligation to pay additional amounts in respect thereof.

In addition, even if the U.K. and Dutch competent authorities rule that we should be treated as solely resident in the U.K. for the purposes of the Netherlands-U.K. double tax treaty, under Dutch domestic law dividend payments made by us to Dutch residents may still be required to be paid subject to Dutch dividend withholding tax and we would have no obligation to pay additional amounts in respect of such payments. We intend to seek confirmation from the Dutch tax authorities that such withholding will not be required, but no assurances can be given.

Should Dutch or Italian withholding taxes be imposed on future dividends or distributions with respect to our common shares, whether such withholding taxes are creditable against a tax liability to which a shareholder is otherwise subject depends on the laws of such shareholder’s jurisdiction and such shareholder’s particular circumstances. Shareholders are urged to consult their tax advisors in respect of the consequences of the potential imposition of Dutch and/or Italian withholding taxes.

See “We operate so as to be treated as exclusively resident in the United Kingdom for tax purposes, but the relevant tax authorities may treat it as also being tax resident elsewhere.” in the section - Risks Related to Our Business, Strategy and Operations.